Rug Repair Part 2: Rug-End Securing

The most common repair request is correcting damage to a rug’s ends.

Last time we discussed general principles of rug repair and how to get started. So if you are reading this, it is a sign you want to be a “rug fixer.”

The most common repair request is correcting damage to a rug’s ends. Most consumers have an infatuation with their rug fringe. They want them to look new after cleaning, which is of course impossible. This begins a discussion of rug fringe repair options. 

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Rug Repair Part 6: Torn Corners

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Corner repairs are probably one of the most common “rug fixes” needed by your customers.

Area rug corners get a lot of wear and tear. Foot traffic across corners is particularly damaging. Careless vacuuming can catch corners in beater bar vacuum cleaners and tear the rug’s structure. Damage can also be caused by tugging on corners to move rugs around, which can detach weak or unstable selvages.

Corner repairs are probably one of the most common “rug fixes” needed by your customers. Quick and simple sewing repairs are often all it takes to stabilize corner damage and can sometimes even return the rug to a like-new appearance. Such repairs are easy to learn and are a profitable service that cleaning customers really need. Let’s take a look at two examples and see what can be done to correct these problems.

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Rug Repair Part 4: Sides and Selvages

  • 1. Single overcast wool selvage on an antique Bidjar from Iran
  • 2. Multi-cord selvage. Wool over two warp bundles on an East Caucasian rug. Changes in selvage color are not uncommon in many rug types.

 Last time we discussed fringe repair, so now we move on to the second most common repair request – the sides of the rug.

Like fringe, the sides are exposed to excessive wear and tear and will need attention to keep the rug looking its best.

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Rug Repair Part 5: Curling Edges

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Last time we discussed sides and selvage repair. Now we will look at curling edges - why rugs won’t lay flat and how to correct it.

The corners and edges of rugs often curl up. These problems, unsightly and potentially hazardous, will only get worse with time causing wear and damage that is expensive to repair.

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Rug Repair Part 3: How to Deal with Worn Fringes

Customers are often very concerned about fringe appearance, as they want them white and clean

In the last rug repair article we discussed rug-end finishes and simple wash-floor solutions like using fiberglass window screen to stabilize the rug during cleaning. We also discussed whipstitch and blanket stitches that are different solutions to the problem. Let’s take a look at other options for rug-end repair.

Rugs are, to a great extent, fashion. The current trend is away from fringe. (Think Gabbeh, Tibetan, shag, etc.). However, the majority of rugs coming into wash plants have fringe. Customers are often very concerned about the appearance, as they want them white, or clean at the least, and to look new.

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